Capital Improvements

 

Mimanagish operates in partnership with and rests on permitted US Forest Service land.  In spring of 2017 the USFS requested development of a 20 year master plan for facilities and operations.  This request catalyzed a year long visioning process and fueled energy to tend to Mimanagish's aging infrastructure.  Between November 2017 and May 2018 MNWCUCC, Friends of Mimanagish, and the Columbus community Foundation raised $50,000 to help with immediate infrastructure upgrades and another $25,000 to help with scholarships and operating costs.  In spring of 2018, following a year long visioning process, Committee on Outdoor Ministry and MNWCUCC Board of Directors approved a list of immediate projects.  Below is a snap shot of current progress on this list and a shout out to several businesses who have helped us to realize this critical work.

 

Mattresses

New mattresses were top on the list of requests coming out of the visioning process, particularly from aging friends of Mimanagish.  Also coming out the visioning process was a common urging to live values of social and environmental responsibility. 

After several months of research and multiple nights of field testing there are now new camp mattresses on all lower bunks, new toppers to extend the life of older full size mattress, and two new queen size mattresses to go in two new bedrooms in the lodge.  

Thank you to Hal Fossum, Dave, and Jim Ferguson, and participants of the Middle School camp for work in prepping the beds for the new mattresses; to Dilynn Wise for installation of the new mattresses; and to our annonymouns field testers.

The mattresses are 100% GOLS latex with blended organic cotton covers.  Latex is a natural substance that comes from trees and the mattresses are manufactured in the USA.

Mimanagish is especially grateful to Mike and FoamOrder.com for a great product and incredible customer service, as well as a significant nonprofit discount, which has helped to make the purchase of these mattresses possible.  

Private Sleeping spaces and Indoor Bathrooms

The only requests to top mattresses were for indoor bathrooms and more private sleeping accommodations. After significant discussion and multiple site visits the decision was made to create two new bedrooms (for a total of 3) and a small bathroom in the Lodge.  

Thank you to Alexa Calio and Healthy Home Natural Interiors for a significant discount on a brand new Phoenix Composting Toilet.

The Phoenix Composting Toilet is made in locally in Whitefish, Montana. 

The Environmental Building News (1998; Vol. 7 No. 6) notes that "composting toilets allow human wastes to be converted into nutrient-rich compost, which can be used to fertilize plants.... Composting toilets save a lot of water by eliminating the use of water for toilet flushing (or at least eliminating most of the water). This reduces extraction pressures on aquifers or surface waters and (with systems connected to municipal sewage treatment plants) educes the energy and environmental costs of treating wastewater. Compared with standard on-site wastewater disposal systems (septic tank and leach field), a composting toilet reduces nutrient loading of the aquifer and lower-elevation surface waters fed by groundwater."

Thank you to Kick Off Camp participants George, Alan, and Bruce, and Over The Hill Gang participants Bruce, Paul, and Boyce for work on demolition and construction of new rooms. Thank you to Jeanne for organization of the new office in the old camp store and to Jeanne and Cheryl for persistent work reorganizing the craft closet.  Thank you to 

 Bruce and Paul finish framing in a new bedroom wall.

Bruce and Paul finish framing in a new bedroom wall.

 Boyce tears out a craft room closet for the new bathroom

Boyce tears out a craft room closet for the new bathroom


 Patty and Boyce prep for rail posts; in the back Nate and Bob plan their next move

Patty and Boyce prep for rail posts; in the back Nate and Bob plan their next move

New Decks

In spring of 2017 the Lodge deck was deemed in dire need of repair.  The old deck rested directly on the ground and was rotting through in several places.  

In March of 2018, Full Moon deck--which otherwise appeared to have many healthy years of life left--collapsed under the weight of exceptional snow load.

For help with replacement of these decks Mimanagish thanks:

  • George
  • Alan
  • Steve
  • Patty
  • Boyce
  • Trish

 
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